All Things Southern
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All Things Southern

Sunday
May292011

Muscadines

Muscadines are a grapevine species with a musky-sweet taste.  They are indigenous to the South as they are well adapted to native warm and humid climates.  Muscadines range from bronze to dark purple to black in color when ripe.  Some Southerners consider the skins too tough to eat and they will eat the fruit raw by biting a small hole in the skin, then sucking the thick gelatinous insides into their mouth, taking care to spit out the seeds embedded in it.  Though mostly used fresh, muscadines have also been locally used in making home-brewed wine, juice and jelly.

Sunday
May292011

Owen Brennan's Viewux Carre Restaurant

This New Orleans French restaurant was actually founded by Irishman Owen Brennan in 1946.  Owen was also the owner of the Old Absinthe House on Bourbon Street.  It is home of the three-hour 'Breakfast at Brennan's' and signature dishes, such as Eggs Hussarde and Bannanas Foster.

You can visit their site at http://www.brennansneworleans.com/

Sunday
May292011

Pralines

Pronounced: 'prawlines'

Traditionally these wafer thin, super sweet confectionary delights consist of cane sugar and pecans and are especially popular in the New Orleans area.

Sunday
May292011

Roux

Pronounced: 'rue'

Roux is a mixture of flour and fat, typically lard, butter or oil.  It is used to thicken gumbos and other stew-like dishes common to Creole or French cooking.  The rule of thumb is that the darker the roux, the less thickening power it has.  Most often when asked about making a Creole dish, one would reply "Well, first you make a roux".

Sunday
May292011

Sop

This is a verb used to describe the act of using some type of bread, wether it be a biscuit, hoecake or cornbread to soak up any remaining liquid from one's plate.